Primal, Tribal

When it’s too hot to do anything but fuel up.The current Spring season has been whirling me around.

I am so dizzy, but a good dizzy,

An Alice in Wonderland dizzy,

A dancing around the May pole dizzy.

For it is Walpurgisnacht coming up in the southern hemisphere.

I can feel Frey all around me.

I feel a fire inside of me,

I can feel my primal urges,

I feel tribal,

I feel my ancient ancestors.

I feel the urge to dance around a fire,

To bang my fists on the ground,

To stamp my feet around so loud,

Until the Gods feel every vibration I am sending out.

A need to journey to places in my mind,

So far inside myself,

Places that I have never been before,

Places that only the primal, the tribal within can get to.

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Calendar Confusion. I mean Conversion.

For those of us that live in the southern hemisphere, celebrating the seasons can be a very difficult experience, especially for those new to the path.  Winter is Summer, Autumn is Spring and it can all get very confusing.  Even more so for those that live in tropical, desert or polar climates that do not have the typical Summer-Autumn-Winter-Spring format.

Whilst most of you that are reading this blog (well I hope you are reading it), are about to embark on Autumn/Fall and getting ready to celebrate either Winter Finding or Mabon (whichever wheel you prefer) we down here in the southern part of the globe have just come into Spring.

Map-Southern-Hemisphere-2015
http://www.plantsgalore.com/plants/types/maps/00M-Map-Southern-Hemisphere.htm

So here is what most of you would see when looking at a Wheel of the Year.  These are northern hemisphere dates so will be very familiar to most of you.

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Wheel of the common holidays in “Pagan” spirituality. (Heathen Holidays)
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Wheel of the Year (Celtic Calendar)

Now here is the process that goes in to making them fit with the southern hemisphere seasons.

WorkInProgess

Which then becomes this:

Blot/Sabbat Southern Hemisphere Season Northern Hemisphere
Feast of Thunar July 20th – Aug 18th Winter Jan 20th – Feb 18th
Charming of the Plow Aug 2nd Spring Feb 2nd
Imbolc Aug 1st Spring Feb 1st
Vali Aug 14th Spring Feb 14th
Ostara Sept 19th – 21st Spring March 19th – 21st
Sumarsdag October Spring April
Yggdrasill Day October 22nd Spring April 22nd
Walpurginsnacht Nov 1st Summer May 1st
Beltane Oct 31st – Nov 1st Summer April 30th – May 1st
Midsummer Dec 20th – 21st Summer June 20st – 21st
Litha Dec 21st Summer June 21st
Lughnasadh/Lammas Feb 2nd Autumn August 2ndt
Frey Faxi Feb 28th Autumn August 28th
Winter Finding March 20th – 21st Autumn Sept 20th – 21st
Mabon March 21st Autumn Sept 20th
Winter Night’s April 30th – May 1st Autumn Oct 31st – Nov 1st
Samhain April 30th – May 1st Autumn Oct 31st – Nov 1st
Mother’s Night June 21st or 22nd Winter Dec 21st or 22nd
Yule June 21st Winter Dec 21st
Yule June 21st – July 2nd Winter Dec 21st – Jan 1st

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I am still in the process on trying to create a nice and aesthetically pleasing Southern Hemisphere Heathen Calendar but I do have a Southern Hemisphere Celtic Wheel.

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Found on Pinterest

There are a number of books and websites that I use to help with the conversion of these times and dates.

Dancing the Sacred Wheel – Frances Billinghurst (you can purchase this through either Kindle or Wordery)

Rituals of Celebration – Jane Meredith (Book Depository)

Spheres of LightFrances Billinghurst Blogarchaeoastronomy.comOut of the WinterAn Asatru BlogAsatru AlliancePagan Calendar, Asatru Holidays Wiki, Wheel of the Year Wiki, Odin’s Volk, Wizard Realm.

 

As mentioned in previous posts, I have been involved in researching and writing up some Celtic Wheel of the Year rituals and events for my local pagan community and so am currently focused on that, hence the table above.  I will hope to have something out by December 2016 ready for 2017.  So stay tuned for updates.

So for now my crazies I will leave you with the excitement of either Ostara (yay I love the colours of Spring but hate the pollen & hayfever), Mabon or Winter Finding.

Oh if you find an error or feel that something should be added or rearranged please leave me a comment.

 

Ostara

As I have mentioned in previous posts I am a co-admin for my local Pagan community group and with that I have helped create some generalised information and ritual documents to help out those that may not be experienced or who may just need a little help with ideas on creating their own.

I have been given permission to share these mini essays.  I have found in helping create these little essays that I am also learning some valuable information that I would not normally have learnt had I not been give the role of co-admin.  For that I am extremely grateful for the opportunity to grow within myself and, like Odin, to gain knowledge from others.

“Blooming and Blossoming”

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With the first day of September come the new moon in Virgo.  This is a great time to let go of your perfectionism and allow new ideas to flow inwards.  Set new goals, recharge and let go of your fears.  This is also the time when you begin to bring in all those amazing flowers that have started blooming and blossoming.  Brighten the home with the amazing Spring colours & scents, to get away from the dark moon with mercury in retrograde (again).

The hours of night and day will now equal at the equinox but the day after, the days will grow longer as the warmth and the light are returning to the earth day by day.  This is a beautiful time of joy and balance.  Set intentions for bodily and life balance.  The equinox is a good day for communication and business networking.  Improve your digestive system by drinking bitter teas.

Ostara is the vernal or spring equinox and is the first ‘real’ day of spring, although modern times have spring beginning at the very start of September, you will know within yourself when spring begins for you.  Here is the tropical north I have felt the shift already.

Ostara is more commonly known as Easter and popularly held in line with the Abrahamic Easter in the Northern Hemisphere.  The traditional name comes from the Germanic Goddess Eostre who is of course the Goddess of Spring and New Beginnings.  This is a time when other Spring & Fertility God/desses bless us with their presence.  It is a time of great promise and new growth.  Having made it through the harshness of Winter, you can now celebrate all the new that is around.  Even personal change within yourself will be noticeable around this time.

If seeking guidance, you can play a game of hide & seek with your friends using dyed boiled eggs.  Mark the eggs with runes or your choice of divinatory symbols and the dye them bright colours.  Hide them and ask the seekers to focus on their question whilst hunting.  Before eating the eggs you can then charge the symbols with bright spring energy and chant:

‘Eos, Eostre, Ostre, Eistar, Ostara’

Your home would appreciate a lovely spring clean during this period of celebration.  As the Goddess of new beginnings, Eostre encourages us to clear away the old to make way for the new coming into our lives.  So many opportunities and so much potential for great possibilities will come our way if we just make room for them.  With so much activity in the air, why not start a bee & butterfly friendly garden.

Whilst the Goddess blankets the earth with fertility the God stretches and grows to maturity.  At Ostara the hours of day and night are equal, the light will now take over the darkness and the God & Goddess will aid in the reproduction of the earth.

Adorn your altar with flowers (wild flowers if you can) and place them around your circle.  Fill the cauldron with spring water and flowers especially buds.  Young blooms can be added to your hair for decoration and a small potted plant can adorn your altar.

Dusk or dawn, when neither light nor dark, day or night is the best time to conduct your Osatra ritual.

Many Blessings and Much Prosperity for the coming spring season.

Admin

References

  1. Seasonal Dance – Janice Broch & Veronica MacLer (1993)
  2. Wheel of the Year – Pauline Campanelli (1992)
  3. Rituals of Celebration – Jane Meredith (2013)
  4. Llewellyn’s Witches Spell-a-day Almanac (2017)
  5. Dancing the Sacred Wheel – Frances Billinghurst (2012)
  6. Moontime Diary 2016 – Iris Dentenhof (2016)
  7. Lunar and Seasonal Diary 2016 – Stacy DeMarco(2016)
  8. Spheres of Light – http://spheresoflight.com.au/
  9. Wikipedia – https://en.wikipedia.org/
  10. About Religion – http://paganwiccan.about.com/
  11. Coven Life – https://covenlife.co
  12. Spring Musings – https://runewisdom.wordpress.com
  13. About Ostara – http://earthdna.co.za/
  14. Spring Equinox – https://www.circlesanctuary.org/
  15. Nordic Wiccan – http://nordicwiccan.blogspot.com.au/
  16. Wicca – Scott Cunningham (2004)
  17. Ostara – Thuri Calafia; Llewellyn’s Witches Datebook (2017)
  18. Living Wicca – Scott Cunningham (2011)

Rígsmál – The Lay of Rig

Rig_in_Great-grandfather's_Cottage
“Rig in Great-grandfather’s Cottage” (1908) by W.G. Collingwood [1]

People say in the old stories that one of the Æsir, who was called Heimdall, went on a journey, and as he went along the sea-shore somewhere he came to a household and he called himself Rig*.  This poem is about that story.

The Birth of Thrall

  1. Once walked, ’tis said, the green ways along,
    mighty and ancient, a god most glorious;
    strong and vigorous, striding, Rig.
  2. Ever on he went in the middle of the way,
    till he came to a house with door unclosed.
    He entered straight; there was fire on the floor
    and a hoary couple sitting by the hearth,
    Great-grandfather and mother in ancient guise.
  3. Well knew Rig how to give them counsel,
    he sat him down in the middle of the floor,
    with the home-folk twain upon either side.
  4. Great-grandmother fetched a coarse-baked loaf,
    all heavy and thick and crammed with husk:
    she bore it forth in the middle of the dish,
    with broth in a bowl, and laid the board.
  5. Thence Rig uprose, prepared to rest; —
    well he knew how to give them counsel —
    he laid him down in the middle of the bed
    and the home-folk twain upon either side.
    Thus he tarried three nights together,
    then on he strode in the middle of the road
    while thrice three moons were gliding by.
  6. Great-grandmother bore a swarthy boy;
    with water they sprinkled him, called him Thrall.
    Forthwith he grew and well he throve,
    bur tough were his hands with wrinkled skin,
    with knuckles knotty and fingers thick;
    his face was ugly, his back was humpy,
    his heels were long.
    Straightway ‘gan he to prove his strength,
    with bast a-binding loads a-making,
    he bore home faggots the livelong day.
  7. There came to the dwellings a wandering maid,
    with wayworn feet, and sunburned arms,
    with down-bent nose,- the Bond-maid named.
  8. She sat her down in the middle of the floor;
    beside her sat the son of the house:
    they chatted and whispered, their bed preparing —
    Thrall and Bond-maid — the long day through.
  9. Joyous lived they and reared their children.
    Thus they called them: Brawler, Cowherd,
    Boor and Horsefly, Lewd and Lustful,
    Stout and Stumpy, Sluggard, Swarthy,
    Lout and Leggy. They fashioned fences,
    they dunged the meadows, swine they herded,
    goats they tended and turf they dug.
  10. Daughters were there, — Loggy and Cloggy,
    Lumpy-leggy, and Eagle-nose,
    Whiner, Bondwoman, Oaken-peggy,
    Tatter-coat and the Crane-shanked maid.
    Thence are come the generations of thralls.

The Birth of Churl

  1. Ever on went Rig the straight roads along
    till he came to a dwelling with door unclosed;
    he entered straight; there was fire in the floor;
    Grandfather and Grandmother owned the house.
  2. The home-folk sat there hard a-working;
    by them stood on the floor a box;
    hewed the husband wood for a warp-beam;
    trim his beard and the locks o’er his brow,
    but mean and scanty the shirt he wore.
  3. The wife sat by him plying her distaff,
    swaying her arms to weave the cloth,
    with snood on her head and smock on her breast,
    studs on her shoulders, and scarf on her neck.
  4. Well knew Rig how to give them counsel;
    he sat him down in the middle of the floor,
    and the home-folk twain upon either side.
  5. Grandmother set forth plenteous dishes;
    cooked was the calf, of dainties best.
    Thence Rig uprose prepared to rest. —
    Well he knew how to give them counsel —
    he laid him down in the middle of the bed
    and the home-folk twain upon either side.
  6. Thus he tarried three nights together,
    then on he strode in the middle of the road
    while thrice three moons were gliding by.
  7. A child had Grandmother, Churl they called him,
    and sprinkled with water and swathed in linen,
    rosy and ruddy, with sparkling eyes.
    He grew and throve, and forthwith ‘gan he
    to break in oxen, to shape the harrow,
    to build him houses and barns to raise him,
    to fashion carts and follow the plough.
  8. Then home they drove with a key-hung maiden
    in goat-skin kirtle, named Daughter-in-Law.
    They wed her to Churl in her bridal linen:
    the twain jade ready, their wealth a-sharing,
    kept house together, and joyous lived.
  9. Children reared they thus they called them:
    Youth and Hero, Thane, Smith, Yeoman,
    Broad-limb, Peasant, Sheaf-beard, Neighbour,
    Farmer, Speaker and Stubbly-beard.
  10. By other names were the daughters called:
    Dame, Bride, Lady, Gay, and Gaudy,
    Maid, Wife, Woman, Bashful, Slender.
    Thence are come the kindreds of churls.

The Birth of Earl

  1. Still on went Rig the straight roads along
    till he came to a hall whose gates looked south.
    Pushed was the door to, a ring in the post set:
    he forthwith entered the rush-strewn room.
    Each other eyeing, the home-folk sat there —
    Father and Mother, — twirling their fingers.
    There was the husband, string a-twining,
    shafting arrows and shaping bows:
    and there was the wife o’er her fair arms wondering,
    smoothing her linen, stretching her sleeves.
    A high-peaked coif and a breast-brooch wore she,
    trailing robes and a blue-tinged sark.
    Her brow was brighter, her breast was fairer,
    her throat was whiter than driven snow.
  2. Well knew Rig how to give them counsel;
    he sat him down in the middle of the floor,
    and the home-folk twain upon either side.
  3. Then took Mother a figured cloth,
    white, of linen, and covered the board;
    thereafter took she a fine-baked loaf,
    white of wheat and covered the cloth:
    next she brought forth plenteous dishes,
    set with silver, and spread the board
    with brown-fried bacon and roasted birds.
    There was wine in a vessel and rich-wrought goblets;
    they drank and revelled while day went by.
  4. Well knew Rig how to give them counsel;
    he rose ere long and prepared his couch:
    he laid him down in the middle of the bed,
    and the home-folk twain upon either side.
  5. Thus he tarried three nights together;
    then on he strode in the middle of the road
    while thrice three moons were gliding by.
  6. Then a boy had Mother; she swathed him in silk,
    and with water sprinkled him; called him Earl.
    Light were his locks, and fair his cheeks,
    flashing his eyes like a serpent’s shone.
  7. Grew Earl forthwith in the halls and ‘gan
    to swing the shield, to fit the string,
    to bend the bow, to shaft the arrow,
    to hurl the dart, to shake the spear,
    to ride the horse, to loose the hounds,
    to draw the sword, and to swim the stream.
  8. Forth from the thicket came Rig a-striding,
    Rig a-striding, and taught him runes,
    his own name gave him, — as son he claimed him,
    and bade him hold the ancestral fields, —
    the ancestral fields — and the ancient home.
  9. Then on rode Earl through the murky wood,
    through the rimy fells till he reached a hall.
    His shaft he shook, his shield he brandished,
    his steed he galloped, his sword he drew;
    war he wakened, the field he reddened,
    the doomed he slew, and won him lands —
    till alone he ruled over eighteen halls.
    Gold he scattered and gave to all men
    treasures and trinkets and slender-ribbed horses;
    wealth he strewed and sundered rings.
  10. Along dewy roads his messengers drive
    till the hall they reached where Ruler dwelt.
    A daughter owned he, dainty fingered,
    fair and skilful, Erna called.
  11. They wooed her and brought her home a-driving;
    to Earl they wed her in veil fine-woven:
    husband and wife lived happy together,
    their children waxed and life enjoyed.

The Birth of King

  1. Heir was the eldest, Bairn the second,
    Babe, Successor, Inheritor, Boy,
    Descendent, Offspring, Son, Youth, Kinsman;
    Kon the kingly was youngest born.
  2. Forthwith grew up the sons of Earl;
    games they learned, and sports and swimming,
    taming horses, round shields bending,
    war shafts smoothing, ash spears shaking;
    but King the youngest alone knew runes,
    runes eternal and runes of life.
    Yet more he knew, — how to shelter men,
    to blunt the sword-edge and calm the sea:
    he learnt bird language, to quench the fire flame,
    heal all sorrows and soothe the heart;
    strength and might of eight he owned.
  3. Then he strove in runes with Rig, the Earl,
    crafty wiles he used and won,
    so gained his heritage, held the right thus
    Rig to be called and runes to know.
  4. Young King rode once through thicket and wood,
    shooting arrows and slaying birds,
    till spake a crow, perched lone on a bough:
    “Why wilt thou thus kill birds, young King?
    ‘Twould fit thee rather to ride on horses,
    to draw the sword and to slay the foe.
  5. “Dan and Damp have dwellings goodlier,
    homesteads fairer than ye do hold;
    and well they know the keel to ride,
    the sword to prove and wounds to strike.”[2]

*Rig: the name is derived from the Irish (ríg in other cases) meaning ‘king’.  The identification of Heimdall with Rig is not absolutely secure, since it is based only on the prose introduction, but the beginning of Völuspá (the Seeress’s Prophecy), asking for attention from all ‘the offspring of Heimdall’, seems to suggest that the god did have some connection with the creation of mankind.[3]

References

  1. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/R%C3%ADgs%C3%BEula#/media/File:Rig_in_Great-grandfather%27s_Cottage.jpg
  2. Bray, O. (1908). The Elder or Poetic Edda. Part I {The Mythological Poems, volume II.
  3. Larrington, C. (1996). trans. The Poetic Edda.

 

Heathen Vacations

So vacations are meant to be all about joy, relaxing, peace etc etc…. right?  Well what if part of it is to meet up for a reunion with ex-in-laws? (I am a strong believer that my kids deserve to be active on all sides of family even if that means I have to too.)

Well I had made some great plans for our vacation, events, catch-ups, meet-ups, just all round fun stuff for all of us… that was until I found out that no-one had bothered to confirm any dates with me.  I mean I am travelling about 2600kms (1700 miles) one way via car for this holiday and if I hadn’t mentioned we were coming there would not be a reunion.  So why not consult and confirm with the person who is travelling down if the dates you have arranged are suitable… Who is to say I hadn’t postponed the trip a week, then where would you be then?

Anyone, extremely disappointed that we are now not able to attend a few events and now having to extend the holiday by a week (GRRRRRR) I am at least able to attend a friends birthday. We will just have to play it by ear and see what happens, after all it really is about a holiday to relax… and check out locations for when we move in 2017.

So I have begun sorting through things I want to take for various reasons.  You see I am hoping to catch up with some of my fellow heathens along the way.

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Melbourne Heathen Moot

One of the events I will be missing is the Melbourne Heathen Moot, that happens once a month, which was going to be the highlight of my trip.  You see I am pretty much alone up here in Far North Queensland, don’t get me wrong there is an awesome Pagan community here and if you are ever in Cairns I suggest getting in contact with them to find out when they have their next Meet & Greet.  But Heathen-wise… not many of us (that are out in the open anyway).

 

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I digress as per usual.

I have planned out my trip down and part of my trip back, but it seems I now am stuck in one location for a full 2 week period instead of 1 week.  I have already reached out to a few Heathens that are happy to connect as well as to the local Pagan community in that area and have arranged a Meet & Greet which I am looking forward too.  It will also allow me to catch up with friends that I have not seen in 4 years since I left.

My biggest dilemma has been books, what books to take, what books do I need?  There will be well-versed Heathens that will be able to offer me more than I them, yet there will also be others that wish to know some information that I can share.  Plus I need to consider my own journey and relaxing time too.

So I have devised a stack (yes, stack) that I think will be best suited to all round conversation.

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I posted this on Instagram too 🙂

What do you think?  I also have a journal/notebook there that does have some of my own brain-matter in there.  Have I left out anything?  Should I leave out anything?  Do you want the reasons I chose those certain books?  Of course you do…

So let’s start from the bottom shall we… Mind you they are stacked in order of size (OCD included free of charge).

*N.B I do not get paid by any companies or authors I personally link to or review, but I am always open to the offer 😉

Dictionary of Northern Mythology – Rudolf Simek: I think this is an essential book to have on your shelf as it is a great ‘Dictionary’ for the exact purpose of any other dictionary.  If I am not sure of something or not sure if I am in the right area I grab this book for quick reference.  Definitely a travel companion.

A Practical Heathen’s Guide to Asatru – Patricia Lafayllve : Another essential must-have book for your shelf.  I live in this book and it is super affordable.  Patricia gets to the point and gives you the information you need as well as a plethora of references to further your own research.  Definitely a travel companion.

Down Among The Dead Men – Michelle Williams: This is for me, my relaxing read.  Michelle tells of her life in the Mortuary business and I am excited to read it.  I have always thought a Mortuary Technician would be a great job to have.  At least the dead have respect for the living (most of the time). Not up for debate.

Elen of the Ways & Tress of the Goddess – Elen Sentier: These two are for my own journey that I am on and studying.  I have recently been drawn to Elen of the Ways and only recently found out why.  I explain it here in a recent post and so am reading as much as I can on the Deer Trod path.  I do have Irish & Scottish ancestry so I intend to learn about it.  I bought Tress of the Goddess because I really enjoy Sentier’s writing style.  Not up for debate.

Asatru for Beginners – Erin Lale: Although this is a thin book (and currently over-priced in my opinion), it is still a great beginners book.  Many have negative comments to say about this book, but I feel this is coming from an academic view.  Lale writes in a very simplistic format that is easy to understand and I stand by my opinion of this being the essential starter for teens, it has some good starting off points and references.

Essential Asatru – Diana Paxon: This is another great beginner book for those just starting out and it was my first.  This is a great book for adults just beginning on their journey and is a great before jumping into Lafayllve’s Practical Guide.  It has a great structure and is easy to follow.  I would not be hungry for more information if I had not came across this book as it really gets you wanting to know more.

The Poetic Edda – Snorri Sturluson: My favourite translation is by Carolyne Larrington or Jackson Crawford but there are many different translations available to either buy or free online.  This is of course a staple in many Heathens library, I myself have about 6-7 translation either in paperback, kindle or pdf.  I always suggest that you should have at least 3 translations to get a good over-all understanding of the context of the poems within.  This is NOT, I repeat, this is NOT a bible or holy text that should be followed to the letter.  It is a collection of poems written by a Christian 200 years after the conversion of Iceland to Christianity.  Yes Snorri wanted to ensure the history remained intact but it is still written with his own bias.  As with anything written in historical or anthropological context, the authors own bias must be defined and then their work must be critically read.  Shoot me down… Haters will hate but my opinion is just that… MINE.  I do have Crawford’s Edda on Kindle (I want to get a paperback copy eventually) so Larrington’s is just for ease and not a necessity.

What is History? – E.H Carr: I am currently studying history and this is a required text.  Although my unit doesn’t start until February, I need to get a head start as I will be relocation just before the trimester starts.  Not up for debate.

Women Who Run With The Wolves – Clarissa Pinkola Estes PhD:  A staple in any woman’s library and not a cover-to-cover read but a turn to and digest style book.  I still have read little but you only have to read or listen to other people’s reviews of this book to know that you must buy it.  I wish I had a Kindle version as it is a thick book.  Not a necessity but a want.

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Aleister Crowley’s Mirror of the Soul Tarot Deck, Stacey DeMarco’s Goddesses & Sirens and Gods & Titans Oracle Decks

 

 

I have decided not to take my laptop as I want to reduce the time spent on technology and have tossed up the idea of using periscope to upload some videos of our journey to the deep south (of Australia) haha.  I am still undecided on whether I am taking 2 or 3 tarot/oracle decks with me… that will be a personal decision.  I am still learning Tarot and Oracle so I need to bring at least 1 with me. My daughter also has her tarot that she is learning and her camera & tripod to pack.

I do have more books that I would love to take but I only have a little car, 2 kids, a tent, sleeping bags, pillows, an esky and, well we need clothes that must go in a suitcase…

 

 

So my crazies I will leave it there… I will let you offer sound advice as to which books to leave or to add to the stack.  I hope you all enjoy the rest of the day… Oh and yes I know the blog as changed designs… I am still not happy with it so there will be a few more changes to the style but I will find the perfect fit eventually.